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's really about technology. because none of these unconventional shale plays would matter if we didn't have the tech to make it economical to drill it. what we really have is an energy technology revolution and these advances aren't unique to north america. they're spreading all over the globe, and who's spearheading this transformation? who represents the vanguard of the oil revolution and its intellectual property? easy. that's core labs. clb. i like to think of it as a technology company that happens to be in the oil service business. core's proprietary technology helps oil companies figure out where to drill. it also helps them squeeze more crude out of existing reservoirs. now, core labs got hit hard today, down $3.41, 2.63%. the company just reported a terrific quarter. 7 cent earnings beat off $1.15 basis. revenue coming in higher than expected up 11% year over year. and raising its guidance for next quarter. don't have a lot of companies doing that. i think the stock bounces back and then some tomorrow. typically core labs is one of those stocks that seems to get hit every tile time
are inventive, creative, technologically brilliant, these bets are starting to backfire. meanwhile, other companies decide to focus here. this is -- remember the 310 million? and when their executives get it right, it's nothing short of magnificent. especially on one more ugly day like today. let's use the earnings reports just from this week to drive home the point. start with verizon, one of my absolute favorite companies, reporting outstanding growth, adding more than 600,000 subscribers and simultaneously getting each subscriber on average to pay more. pay more for the service because they're selling more smartphones, data hogs. incredible numbers. i can't believe that verizon has 93 million subscribers. that's almost one in three of all the people here. even better, verizon has nary a subscriber here or here. that means it can't disappoint, because if you have customers in this place or that place, they're letting you down! they're not buying! they're not doing what we thought they'd do. so verizon represents the best we have, domestic security growth, terrific balance sheet, and don
and stealth technology and ability to fight at supersonic speeds. it may be the way it has been able to avoid the budget cutters in washington. ha >> "washington journal," continues. host: we are talking about the roles of security cameras in asian oil security. welcome to the program. talk to us about your thoughts and feelings regarding the role of public and private cameras in national security and the impact of these cameras. seen what we have historically is that public cameras are not good at preventing crime. this has come up in the context of london and the united kingdom, which has some of the largest, most saturated cctv areas. the studies have shown that these cameras are not good for prevention purposes. the next question is are they good for solving crimes? what we have seen in london, which is one of the most saturated areas, is that the cameras are not good at solving crimes. a police steady in london shows that for every 1000 camera there was only one crime that was solved. you have a question of effectiveness. what we see is that they are not. we hear. they did not help to so
effective attributes are not all of its radars and sensors and missiles and stealth technology and the ability to fight at supersonic speeds. it may well be the way it has been designed to evade budget cutters in washington. >>fe between the f-35 and the f-22? >> the f-22 has had its share of technical troubles. that was supposed to be the high-end fighter. the replacement for the f-15. it is a real high performance fighter. it is meant to win against any potential adversary in dogfights. the plan was to have fewer f-22 and then you would have more of the f-35. that would be the mainstay, for the next 40 or 50 years. if you are fighting against a sophisticated adversary, the f 22argoing in and they e fighting in the air against the adversaries of combat aircraft. the f-35s comes in and they are carrying the bombs that will take out the other military targets. they are the second waves that come in to do the real heavy lifting. these are planes that are supposed to be all purpose. the f-35 is supposed to be able to provide support to combat troops on the ground if they're fighti
how to connect our technology, people and ideas and figure out how to cooperate and most importantly make a commitment to prevent these deaths from happening. 10 years ago there was a young woman named lenora alexander, she was a healthy 11-year-old irl and she underwent elective surgery to correct something at a prestigious hospital. the awoke at 2:00 a.m., victim of respiratory arrest, caused by a drug that was intended to ease her pain. but if she had been monitored continuously after the surgery, hospital staff and lenora may have been alerted and leah would probably have been rescued. but there are other sort of preventable deaths that deals with washing hands, transferring of infections when hands aren't washed properly. monitoring has already picked up by lenora's tragic situation. her situation is not unique, unfortunately. a summit came together to figure out what can we do to solve the problem going back to the coordination, cooperation that i spoke about earlier. the fact is at this patient safety, technology and science summit, people, trained professionals came togethe
is the next question. >> caller: the standards and technology. the agency tasked with buildis fail -- >> host three mike. do you have ollowup question? we undd whe you are going. >> caller: sample -- >> host: we'll see what the senator has to say about that. 9/11 conspiracy theories and different ways of looking at 9/11. what are your thoughts? >> guest: you know, the report that i go by is 9/11 commission frankly, many of the recommendations and assessments have become very relevant this week as we have dealt with a shocking tragedy in tbons. and, you know, actually given me this week an opportunity to reflect on how far we have come, for example, with homeland security in the ten years since that agency was created. as you noted, i'm on the home land security and government affairs committee, and, you know, they are hard at work. the joint terrorism task force through the fbi and homeland security and local officials in boston and trying to bring answers and bring ultimately the perpetrators to bear the full weight of justice in the united states. but, you know, back to the caller's questio
this is developing in the last few hours? >> well, i think this technology is remarkable. a couple years ago i worked on an assassination investigation in lebanon and the amazing ability of modern police force to go after people like this and run them down to ground is amazing. i think that if, in fact, these people have stayed in the united states and these pictures are out everywhere with the police, with facial recognition, that it's a matter of time we get them. >> i mean -- >> assuming they haven't left. >> it's interesting to me because social media has been taking a kicking in the last 36 hours for lots of hype, innuendo, rumor, perhaps the bad side of the way social networking can play in these instances but now we have a clear positive, where somebody took one picture on his iphone, then posted it to facebook, a friend of his on facebook studied that picture once the fbi released these images today and saw the connection. and that in itself could be a really quite dramatic move forward for the fbi. >> yeah, there's no way out of this for them unless they go live in the wilderness or somethin
into trouble. and the technology that helped track down the boston bombing suspects, and the bay area company that is stream lining the process. cutbacks at airports across the nation. will there be massive flight delays in the bay area? and new details about the texas fertilizer blast. what we have now >>> a key part of the search for the boston bombing suspects was the hours of video from the camcorders and the surveillance cameras along monday's race route. but how did police go through it so quickly? jonathon bloom has a look inside the bay area company whose technology helped make that possible. >> reporter: in the wake of the bombing it wasn't an eyewitness, but a high definition camera on top of a department store that told investigators who they were looking for. in a secured facility they pieced it together from video of hundreds of other cameras to identify the suspects. it took days, but a few years ago, it could have take ep months. >> -- taken months. >> if you go to the london train bombings, it was president ared that there were thousands and thousands of investigators that ouc
that is part of what got her into trouble. and the technology that helped track down the boston bombing suspects, and the bay area company that is stream lining the process. cutbacks at airports across the nation. n the bay area?ive flight and new details about texas fertilizer blast. what we have now >>> a key part of the search for the boston bombing suspects was the hours of video from the camcorders and the surveillance cameras along monday's race route. but how did police go through it so quickly? jonathon bloom has a look inside the bay area company whose technology helped make that possible. >> reporter: in the wake of the bombing it wasn't an eyewitness, but a high definition camera on top of a department store that told investigators who they were looking for. in a secured facility they pieced it together from vid of hundreds of other cameras to identify the suspects. it took days, but a few years ago, it could have take ep months. >> -- taken months. >> if you go to the london train bombings, it was president ared that there were thousands and thousands of investigators that o
allocations and potentially alternative technologies that might augment oral replace ship assets we can really trace from the specificics observation that needs to be made to whatever mixture of ways to make it. maybe available to us and provide the best balanced approach to fulfilling those needs. that's called -- we've called that our fleet composition plan. it's been buttoned up in the last couple of weeks. we look forward to discuss that with you in the months ahead. that will be one underpinning. secondly, we have a fleet allocation and planning process that is headed by the head of complete rps with a and participation with the mission and science managers. it is in that form that we trace the available ship capabilities, the equipment of the vessels by priority by priority. >> admiral, i had a question. i don't mean to inject you in another controversial issue, but -- >> what the heck? >> what the heck, we're here anyway. border security, particularly the southern border. as many of us who live in areas where there's water understand, and particularly the entire coastal region is poten
different. >> just in stem. science, technology. >> you can easily imagine where people are just issuing an ma exclusively's approval can get a visa. do not think that would make sense. >> i think we have gone over time. i have one mins left. have one more round. >> we have not had around and she has to be gone. we said we would finish at 5:00. i will give you one more question. how is that? andand you can submit -- any member can submit questions in writing which have to be answered one week later. questions have to be submitted by 5:00 wednesday. go ahead. what specific border security measures does this bill require in the non--high risk sectors. i have struggled to review the bill in that level of detail. sectors, what i understand is, why do they have n effectiveness rate? focusing him on appre -- only focusing on apprehensions? i added that in. i do not understand why we do not have it as a brought up race. broadrought up race -- base. only happenan between sectors on an annual basis. smugglers move every few weeks. >> thank you very much. and we not just add new responsibilities,
the boat. this technology helped authorities keep a careful eye on his movements. >> we have movement in the boat. he just sat up. he's moving. flailing about. quite a bit of movement. >> reporter: they brought in a robotic device to rip open the boat's tarp. >> he'll be fully exposed. okay? >> reporter: after they got the 19-year-old out of the boat, authorities treated him right there on the scene and then sent him to beth israel hospital where he is being treated this morning, alongside the victims of the bombings. and as we all remember, when the capture was announced there were celebrations throughout boston. but there are many urgent questions that remain unanswered. bianna? >> one of those questions, were there any warning signs? in the case of the older brother, it looks like there may have been. we're learning a lot about a falling out between him and his uncle who he had briefly lived with. and this morning, we also know that the fbi interviewed him two years ago. abc's senior justice correspondent pierre thomas has been following it all from washington. good morning, pierre
. our efforts mandate investments in the people, processes, and technology, not just technology, people, processes, and technology. completed training to improve the quality and productivity of claims. more are being trained, and for the new employees at complete more claims per day in their predecessors. use of visibility benefits and questionnaires. online forms for submitting medical evidence has dropped average processing time as a medical exams and improved accuracy. there are now three lines for processing claims, an express line for those that will predictably take less time, a special operations lane for unusual cases or those requiring special handling, and a core lane with roughly 60 percent of the claims, and that is the remainder. technology is critical, and in the backlog. our paperless processing system, veterans benefits management system will be faster and improve access, live automation, and reduce aryans. thirty regional offices now use this. of 56 will have it by the end of this year. homelessness, the last of our three particles, to end veterans homelessness in 2015.
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is they are hot on technology, but if they are on the s&p 500. stuart: down 25% so far this year. down about 50% from september, october of last year. we get the earnings next week. a big buildup for that. tuesday of next week, i believe. the opening quote for apple had a fault right up front. that is what we were looking for. nicole: for dollars four cents. yesterday, we broke below $400. the first time since december of 2011. that was the last time we were below $400. stuart: thank you. i am sure we will be watching this all day long. two more big names. ebay, disappointing profit forecast there. a very weak european economy. ebay is down 4%. a big loss. american express cardholders at spending like they used to. profits okay. that lower spending, that is a worrying big picture. look at toyota. a first there. the company will start producing a lexus model in kentucky. that is very interesting. i think that is the first time the ultra luxury high-end brand lexis will be made in america. nicole: right. they are getting incentives to do so. you see the stock is down slightly. your today, toyota
and can only respond to known threats. cyberthreats evolve at the speefed technology and this measure helps the private sector protect against cyberattacks by providing companies with the latest cyberthreat information from the intelligence community which has timely classified information about destructive malware. this cyberthreat intelligence is the information that companies and the government need to protect and defend their networks. the so-called signatures are primarily made up of numerical codes consisting of zeros and ones without any perm information attached. -- any personal information atammed. cispa is a result of cooperation between the community, companies and to a certain degree the white house as it pertains to many measures included in this legislation. during their efforts to improve the bill, they also maintain a dialogue with privacy advocates in an effort to strengthen civil liberties, protections and oversights. i had a personal note here for the reason that over a period of 10 years i served eight of those years on the intelligence committee. and the now chair
governments in rural governments spending hundreds of millions of pounds. these technologies are not costless. they have to be evaluated in the balance of the entirety of the law enforcement budget and the government budget. and ultimately, if we are spending money on surveillance cameras, that we possibly don't need. if we have enough. we might be taking police off the street. we might be putting roads in disrepair. we could be taking money from the schools or raising taxes. these technologies are not costless. they're not costless in terms of the budget or civil liberties. >> thank you for your time. greatly appreciate it. now more on the investigation and the aftermath. let me bring in congressman keith ellis, the first muslim elected to congress. first i'm sure you've heard the news that dzhokhar tsarnaev has been charged with using weapons of mass destruction in the boston marathon attacks. we're reading through the charges. learning more about what the fbi seized from his room. they described a large pyrotechnic, a black jacket and white cap. the big concern in addition to his brother's
-skilled immigration area. at microsoft and across the technology sector, we are increasingly grappling with a significant challenge. we are not able to fill all the jobs we are creating. the numbers help to share the story. at a te when unemployment hovers just below 8% unemployment rate in computer and mathematical operation has fallen to 3.2%, and in many states in many subcategories it has fallen below 2%. unfortunately the situation is likely to get worse, better -- rather than better. it is estimated that this year the economy will create over 120,000 jobs. in this will require a bachelor degree in computer science. all of the countries together will produce only 51,474 of these degrees. that is why high-skilled immigration and this legislation is of such great importance. the bill you are considering does three very important things. first, it addresses trd shortag. it eliminates or goes very far to reduce the backlog. it eliminates the per country cap and a crew to create a green card category for advanced cream degrees. all things that are needed. second, the bill quite rightly
technology, it's the only way to track them. if we invested what we should've in the air traffic system, we would have -- may not solve all of chuck's problems, but a much faster, flowing system. >> by the way, if you modernize it, you can cut back on some of the workforce permanently and save money there. that's the other issue. it's very labor intensive because of the issue that steve just described. >> before we go to break, the president is dining tonight with members of the senate, all women, isn't that nice? >> that's great. >> chuck todd, thank you. we'll see you at 9:00 on the "daily rundown." >> i'm surprised that didn't get ugly just then. >> right. >> that's great. >> we went to counseling. >>> up next, steve rattner has charts on signs of a spring slowdown. more "morning joe" when we come back. but i wondered what a i tcustomer thought? is great, hi nia... nice to meet you nia, i'm mike. what do you drive? i have a ford explorer, i love my car. and you're treating it well? yes i am. there are a lot of places you could take your explorer for service, why do you bring it back to t
. three more minutes until "fox & friends." ♪ using telemedical and mobile technologies, verizon innovators are connecting trauma surgeons to patients in the field. helping them get the attention they need, before they even reach the hospital. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. >> alisyn: we are rejoined by the founder of american islamic form for democracy. dr. zdudi jasser. you talk about how you wish that more law abiding, peaceful muslims would come out and condemn these things when it happened. you must have been heartened by the suspect's uncle who immediately came out and vociferously said he completely disavow what they stand for. he's disgusted by the actions and he wishes he could turn them in. if he knew where they were. is that what you are talking about? >> yeah. at the last step, absolutely, that is disheartening. they don't get radicalized overnight. they are talking about conspiracy theories and nonsense about being framed. this is easy when someone doesn't ask for the community to say he was kicked out
volume, expertise, team and of course the technology. when it comes together you have a successful surgery. >>brian: if you want successful surgery with a robot, 1-800-samadi. go to your facebook and get the ten questions. that's why you're on medical a team. straight ahead, they came to america so they could home school their children. now the united states wants to kick them out. there is a big update on this case in the next hour. plus, is that a tiger in the bathroom? yes, it is. how in the world did it get there? there? i ask you that. i think ford service is great, but i wondered what a customer thought? describe the first time you met. you brought the flex in... as soon as i met fiona and i was describing the problem we were having with our rear brakes, she immediately triaged the situation, knew exactly what was wrong with it, the car was diagnosed properly, it was fixed correctly i have confidence knowing that if i take to ford it's going to be done correctly with the right parts and the right people. get a free brake inspection and brake pads installed for just 49.95 afte
. the technology may be hard to imagine. but why you would want it... is not. the 2014 e-class. it doesn't just see the future. it is the future. am i don't know. any medications? last immunization shots? really? honey, what's my blood pressure medicine called? one time i took something and i blew up like a puffer fish. i'm probably allergic to that. at kaiser permanente, your medical information is available to you and your doctors. quickly. securely. no guesswork required. better information. better care. kaiserpermanente. thrive. we believe it can be the most valuable real estate on earth. ♪ that's why we designed our newest subaru from the back seat forward. introducing the all-new, completely restyled subaru forester. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. [ explosion ] >> i can't hear, i can't hear. >> a giant plant explosion levels a small town in texas. >> the shock wave was unbelievable and threw me down. >> get out of here. that second tank is about to go, get out of here! >> investigators zero in on a possible suspect in the boston marathon bombings. >> they see a person on surveil
it's terrible with all the technology we have that they couldn't make a sweep of this area. they said they had bomb-sniffing dogs. job.nk it is an inside republicans can get over that nine of what happened on their watch. it will do anything to try to read it host: you are blaming this on the republican party? .aller: no i would imagine that some people in the republican party -- host: what evidence? caller: i do not have evidence but i have the evidence of previous things they did. they try to make benghazi into another 9/11. they will do anything in their power to make another 9/11 in president obama's watch. host: from the wall street journal this morning, this is what the report -- mitt am a little bit in the papers. times." "the new york writes this -- the is from mike mccall, chairman of homeland security. was quoted as saying -- also from the papers this morning, -- also from "usa today," more about the bomb -- clay in cape cod, massachusetts, go ahead -- concernedam quite about what happened, obviously. i have to tell you -- yesterday was patriots did. people forget that when
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time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
played a big role in the boston bombing story this week. kron four's jeff bush explains how technology helped and hurt the flow of information. >> reporter: the entire country was focused on the events in boston all week long. it was a drama that played out on every possible platform imaginable. on monday, youtube videos were uploaded shortly after the bombing. this was a big asset to detectives who were just beginning their investigation. twitter was essential with getting the word out about the bombing but also helped people reconnect with loved ones after the explosions. internet sleuths were hard at work enhancing video and still images and uploading themagain, playing a key roll in helping police figure out who the bombers were. then, on thursday, when the fbi released the photos of the bombing suspects those images were shared across all platforms of social media. at the same time, police were looking into the youtube and twitter accounts of the bombing suspects to get some insight about possible motivations. the drama intensified on the computer screen early friday morning when
investment in renewable and energy. give the benefit of the technology got when they were young industry. >> is it the anticipation in the next ten or fifteen years that all of the renewables will be able to catch up in surpass what is currently with oil, gas, and coal. >> over time. >> i have no problem with wind and hydroelectricity and solar. the assumption that we're going take away normal business expense from oil and gas and coal which will slow down the reduction and increase price. the same as the cigarette tax currently in the budget actually said we want to decrease usage by increasing the price. we get rid of revenue. it seems to be the same with oil, gas, and coal. we increase the price at the pump or home heating oil or electricity increase the price of those and try to supplement off to other areas which every economist i've seen deals with energy economy said those technologies probably not for thirty years or more to get close it catching up. 9 percent of the portfolio we supplement the other 1eu89%. >> i don't think the proposal on oil and gas industry work. i would be h
as technology and people become more savvy? what are we doingak c protect ourselves from things tt are chemical, biological, and radiological? >> gen 3 is undergoing an assessment as to whether it will ultimately be it for the money we are putting into it. rather than head into a large aqueous vision -- a large acquisition, there are enough problems with it that our acquisitions review board has asked for an individual assessment that is on a timeline. there is carryover money that can be deployed. it is really a matter of let's make sure that he forward to a large acquisition, we really know what we are doing and what we are getting. or have been problems with the gen 3.tages of jen -- one i would point to is a major whicht by the president is that national bio facility in kansas. we have been for a long time we knew -- need a new level for lab. they kansas legislature has agreed to put in roughly $300 million. we put in 700 million or so for the facility. -- if this is approved and appropriated, we can begin to structure and of a major lap and be done by 2020. i think long-term infrastructure
by the rules supporting our farmers, and innovating for our technology companies, or creating businesses of their own. our nation continues to benefit from immigrants, as it did when my parents came here. we need to uphold the fundamental values of family, rd work, and fairness. in vermont, immigration has promoted cultural riches, refugee resettlement, student exchange. economic development to the five regional senate programs, tourism, and trade with our friends, in that wonderful country of canada. foreign agricultural workers support vermont farmers and growers, many of whom become part of families, woven into the fabric of vermont's ag consult -- agricultural community as they have in so many other states. the dysfunction of the system affects all of us. now is our time to fix it. this is our opportunity to do it. act deliberately, but we have to act. we can talk about it, but eventually, we have to vote. millions of people. millions of americans are depending upon us. senator grassley. >> yes. on this side, mr. chairman, we understand why the secretary can't be here and we feel she
they needed to replace older security equipment and technology, expand restricted we keyway system ems and place security levers on all doors which allowed teachers to lock tours doors from the inside. you may say that's not expensive. why do you need to spend money? it sure adds up when you really want to secure a door and you want to do it right. so if you have many, many doors so we can help them do these things. and if they wanted to, make sure they harden their facility, that's what the money is for. now, there's a township in new jersey, they used funds to secure perimeter and playground areas by installing security gates at elementary and intermediate schools to create a safer learning environment. the new exterior fences define school boundaries making the schools safer for students. entourier gates were replaced, providing the ability to lock off specific areas of the schools during emergencies. again, it's common sense but when these schools were built, madam president, no one thought about this. everything was open. like the capitol, when i came here, i'm dating myself, a lo
of the issues we have looked at and there are ways technology-wise to do checks. this legislation does not move in that direction. it is the opposite, prohibiting a national registry so that information about themselves are not made public and not controlled by government. they are controlled by the person who sells the gun, so therefore there is no record of gun ownership and that is specifically admitted under current law and the bills we are taking up today. the suggestion you are making is one we have had in the past. i do not think there is the legislative support to move that type of proposal, but i agree with you that it is worthy to take a look at. look at both sides had right now there is a missed trust of what government will do with that information. those answers need to be -- questions need to be answered. host: from twitter, the fact that it will not stop all people from getting guns is a weak excuse. let me put another issue on the table. you serve on the foreign affairs committee and this is the headline in the international section of "the new york times." government will do wi
shows in terms of sales volume, and we all know how we're using our technology more and more every day for our personal lives and how we defend on it. for example, the national shooting sports foundation surveyed owners of modern sporting rifles in 2010 and found that 10% of them, 10% of all rifles sold had purchased their firearms at gun shows, whereas 25% had purchased them online. 25%. believe me, i understand the political stakes for my colleagues and i sympathize. i have been there. i understand it. and comes from states like west virginia, and no state has a higher regard for the second amendment rights to bear arms than my state. in fact, on the great seal of the state of west virginia, the preamble is montani sember liberai. in latin, that means mountaineers are always free. you know how we feel. one of the review states that became a state during the civil war, broke away from virginia at that time. but west virginians are also guided by a little common sense. i have said this. in west virginia, we know what nonsense is, we know what common sense is, and now we know what gun s
not be all of its radars and sensors and missiles and stealth technology and ability to fight supersonic speeds, it may well be the way it has been designed to evade budget cutters in washington. >> more with rajiv chandrasekaran on c-span "q &a."" a democratoining is from wisconsin, tammy baldwin. we should probably start talking about what happened in the senate yesterday with gun- control. your thoughts? guest: i think the senate of the united states let the american people down yesterday. it was hard for me to fathom some of the basic provisions that enjoyed the support of over 90 percent of americans were voted down. a majority of the senate supported it, but as you know, we have the rules that require 60 votes to a dance certain provisions. certainvance provisions. ad was probably my most disappointing day so far in my short tenure. host: are there a lot of nra members or gun owners in wisconsin? guest: there are many gun owners, just like the country, wisconsin is reflective of that, but i would say the hunting culture and tradition is very deep. if you think about last year's dee
plan calls for more security strategy that combines personnel, the ground, and technology like drones to monitor the border. as far as interior enforcement, there will put in place a mandatory employment garrett overification system, e-verify. and assistant to make sure e- verify is manageable and for employers and fraud-proof, to mae people cannot make up social security numbers or work off stolen social security numbers. st: the gang of eight spoke yesterday on capitol hill. four republicans and four democrats. lindsey graham of south carolina addressed concerns that he has heard from his peers about the pathway to citizenship. [video clip] >> learn the language, as a civics exams, pay a fine, work, pass a criminal background check, half of my family would be excluded. this is no easy task. [laughter] i'm glad we are not applying it to ourselves. i knowe is that america is ready for immigration reform. you look at all the polls. if the congress ready to do something that we should have done a long time ago? i really believe we are. if you think the border can be better secured, we h
records are prime targets for attackers to steal. according to the information technology industry council, 18 adults become victims to cybercrime, including identity campaigns ishing every second. this adds up to 1 1/2 million cybercrime victims each day. cyberattacks present a very real and dangerous threat to the united states, however the government currently
the door for this, but this is why i answer the way i did that i see that with the technology goings way it is and with drone technology advancing and drones getting smaller and smaller, they are not going to the the giant, big predators flying over pakistan, but little small drones to be armed with things. this is not science fiction here in terms of this is actually happening. >> booktv on location on the campus of the university of southern california at the l.a. times festival of books talking with mark mazzetti, "new york times" national security correspondent and author of this book, "the way of the knife," and, jim, you're the next caller from idaho. hi, jim. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen. i have a question. the la proider of servicee of to the war department in afghanistan, and i asked how the afghans were going, and i quoted him in the remark right now saying that it's basically a total failure. he went into details about that aspect of what basic means. what do you think the result is basically in afghanistan? >> well, it's obviously a question on a lot of people's mind.
and technology these is expanding those. i tried to pass it by unanimous consent. than schumer came up and said no, but i will pass, how about passing mind by unanimous consent? i was quite. i would've let this go by unanimous consent. they would have been shocked. i think it would've been great fun to see that all of the week as part of immigration reform just by unanimous consent. >> jerry? >> i have a couple of them. i had ask you why you think so highly of our late mayor, grover cleveland? >> f. i was allowed to go back when i wasn't alive, he seemed to be opposed to special interests. he also seemed to veto a bunch of bills, and i think that, you know, it was a time period, and i think some would call him a populist and i think that part of me feels that way. >> alex and then bolton. >> it was reported you were raising money for the national association for gun rights and it was just reported that last week this came up for conversation in the steering committee luncheon. susan collins was pretty upset about that because national association of gun rights is running ads in her state. she i
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